Nettleton

 

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Map Pre-Enclosure by Rex Rusell

 

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1960, Ted Squires, Holton Road, Garage, Service Station

Coal Merchant & Carter, F. Favill

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Jan 9th 1880, Hull Packet …..John Rawlinson, of Nettleton, labourer, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in the village street there on the 19th ult. The last witness proved the case, and the defendant was fined 10s, with 9s 6d costs.
1903 August 7th Caistor Petty Sessions – Before the Rev H. C. Brewsted (in the chair) and Mr. W Campbell.
…… Thomas Johnson, Nettleton, was fined 1s with 4s 6d costs, for breaking No. 4 by-law at Caistor.

1911 May 4th John Ellmore, of Nettleton, was charged with not keeping a dangerous dog under control on the 16th April, and pleaded guilty. Mrs. Hannah Borrill stated that the dog came into her garden. Fetched a hen out of a coop, and worried it. Cross-examined, witness admitted defendant offered to pay for it. Inquiries by the Bench as to whether any previous complaints had been received elicited the fact that it was only a five months old poppy. Inspector Camm withdrew the summons on payment of the costs.

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Photograph courtesy of Rod Bradley

 

Rod Bradley – Wartime picture at Nettleton, a stall selling Woolton pies,

Mary Baker – The lady third from the left at the back is a Mrs Lockwood.

Peter Harwood – Think the man in the middle with the flat hat on is Albert Tatlock?

Carol Barnes – My Great Aunt Edith Rhodes lived on Church Street and was a staunch Methodist. We would visit her with our Dad going across the fields off the bypass.

 

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1869 Anthony Charles, Malster

 

 

 

 

 

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1903 Alfred R. Campbell

20.12.1856 Market Rasen Mail
Nettleton – Early on the morning of the 12th inst. an attempt was made by some burglars to enter the Rectory at Nettleton, near Caistor. It appears the Rector, Rev. S. Turner, was from home, and the footman hearing some footsteps under his bed-room window, looked out and discovered that a ladder had been reared up against the window of an adjoining room; he at once informed Mrs. Turner, who instructed him to fetch a gun and be in readiness for the intruders; he again opened the window intending to carry out the instructions of his mistress, when a pistol was discharged at him, the ball passing close to his head. Affairs looking more serious, he rang an alarm bell for the groom, who resides at the Lodge, but before he had time to arrive, the burglars had decamped. No clue whatever has been obtained as to who the parties are, and as no property was taken, it is feared they will evade detection. It will be remembered that, some years since, the same house was robbed of a considerable quantity of plate.

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1916 William Watson

January 20 1900, Market Rasen
Larceny
William Sanderson, farm labourer, Claxby Moor, in the employ of Mr. John Burton, was summoned at the insistance of Mr. Benjamin Marshall, Nettleton New Farm, farmer with the theft of a rabbit trap on the 31st Dec. last.
The complainant deposed that the defendant lived in a house adjoining his farm. He had never given him permission to catch rabbits or to take away traps. He could not swear to the trap produced, but had bought a good many like it. He valued it at 6d. He had missed traps previously, but could not account for their disappearance. Other traps produced were similar to those he used.
Charles Leonard, shepherd to Mr. Marshall, a near neighbour of the defendant’s, deposed that on the 29th December last, he set some traps for rabbits in a field belonging to his employer, and adjoining to Mr. Burton’s land, but five or six chains from it.. There were three hedges between the field and the defendant’s house. He went on Saturday night the 30th ult., and found the traps alright. He went on Sunday morning about eight o’clock and found one trap gone out of the three he had set.. He noticed footprints to and from the place where the trap had been, in the direction of the defendant’s house. It was a very rainy morning. He sent for the Holton Constable, and accompanied him to the defendant’s house. This was about eleven o’clock. He left the constable at the defendant’s and went home. Afterwards he brought the traps to him, all of which he identified as the property of his employer. In the afternoon, in the presence of the constable, the defend

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1914 A. E. Kirkness

ant said to him,”Two of the traps had been set  in Mr. Burton’s hedge either by you or someone else, and the other I fetched out of Mr. Marshall’s field this morning.” The other two traps had been lost some considerable time. He had been with Mr. Marshall six years come next May.
P.C. Thurlby, stationed at Holton-Le-Moor, corroborated the statement of the last witness, and stated that he on going to the defendant, who was engaged in the turnip field among sheep, and telling him he was suspected of stealing a rabbit trap from Mr. Marshall’s land, he admitted the theft, and went to his house and got the trap from out of a box upstairs.
As Mr. Marshall did not apply for any costs for himself or servant the defendant was fined 3s 6d, and 6s 6d ordinary costs.

1903 August 7th Caistor Petty Sessions – Before the Rev H. C. Brewsted (in the chair) and Mr. W Campbell.
…… Thomas Johnson, Nettleton, was fined 1s with 4s 6d costs, for breaking No. 4 by-law at Caistor.

1911 May 4th John Ellmore, of Nettleton, was charged with not keeping a dangerous dog under control on the 16th April, and pleaded guilty. Mrs. Hannah Borrill stated that the dog came into her garden. Fetched a hen out of a coop, and worried it. Cross-examined, witness admitted defendant offered to pay for it. Inquiries by the Bench as to whether any previous complaints had been received elicited the fact that it was only a five months old poppy. Inspector Camm withdrew the summons on payment of the costs.

To see the Nettleton Development Plan for 1977 click here: 1977-nettleton-development-guide