Newspaper Cuttings

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
December 15th 1837
Deaths – On the 2nd inst., at Grassby, in middle life, Mary, wife of Mr Edward Thompson, Military Pensioner.

LINCOLN MERCURY
February 14th 1840
GRASBY – Sometime ago Mr J Clarke, farmer, of Grasby, near Caistor, had his barn robbed of five sacks of barley, put aside for delivery. A little while after, he had a stack of beans blown over in a hurricane, and which he covered from the wet with a large stack sheet. In the night half the sheet was cut off and taken away – Mr Burkinshaw, another farmer in the same parish, has had his straw taken out of his yard by men with bands at night, and a woman was seen taking straw from another farmstead. To mention minor thefts of eggs, garden produce, &c, in this depraved village would be tedious and uninteresting – Grasby, with a population of nearly 500 souls, is a church living of £200 a year, but the Clerical Guide does not show that it has any resident clergyman.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
February 27th 1840
A Correspondent observes that his attention has been this week accidentally drawn to an erroneous paragraph which was inserted in the MERCURY. In the impression published Friday 14th instant, it is stated that, Grasby, with a population of nearly 500 souls, is a church living of £200 a year, but the CLERICAL GUIDE does not show that it has any resident clergyman. But it is remembered, that Grasby is only a small village on the high road leading to Brigg, and accordingly visited by many marauders soliciting eleemosynary gifts, such gipseys, beggars of every description; none of its peaceable inhabitants are even suspected, and indeed it would be very ungrateful if they could so far forget their duty to their minister and his lady, who are residing thither as good Samaritans amongst them, and daily employed in feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, living unostentatiously, and communicating religious instruction to both old and young, by their gifts of bibles, testaments, prayer books, and tracts, in a word always ‘doing good’, and ‘would blush to find it fame’. The mischievous paragraph is therefore a foul libel, both upon them and the inhabitants. The CLERICAL GUIDE not showing that it has any clergyman is a cruel as well as unjust attack made upon the respected gentleman and his lady.

LINCOLN MERCURY
September 4th 1840
Suicide of a Young Woman – On Thursday the 27th ult., an inquest was held at Grasby, near Caistor, before George Marris Gent, coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Danby aged 17, a native of Middle Rasen, whose death was occasioned by taking arsenic. It Appeared that the deceased was a servant to William Cavill, foreman to Mr Kirkham of Audleby, and that she left her situation on the 26th. She then went to Caistor, and purchased at a druggists shop half a pound of arsenic, stating that she wanted it for her sister who resided at Grasby. The person who served her at the shop did not entertain any suspicion, in consequence of so large a quantity being asked for. The drug was carefully wrapped in paper and labelled “Poison”. The unfortunate girl took a portion of the poison upon a queen-cake on the road between Caistor and Grasby, and was able to reach her sisters house at the latter place, when she became ill. Mr Hutchinson surgeon, of Caistor, who happened to be in the village, properly attended her, but medical assistance was unavailing, and she died in a few hours. The motive alleged by the poor girl for the rash act was, that her Mistress (Mrs Cavill) was jealous of her, and had spread reports injurious to her character. It was clearly proved, however, to the jury that there was no foundation for the assertion, that the whole was a delusion, and that the unfortunate girl was much afflicted with lowness of spirits, and had frequently imagined that people raised false reports of her. After a patient investigation of all the circumstances of the case, the jury returned a verdict of insanity.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
October 28th 1842
HIGHWAY ROBBERY – About 5 o’clock on Tuesday evening the 18th inst., a young man returning with an empty cart was stopped as he was passing Grassby Bottoms, and rising the hill towards Kirmington. Two men drew near the cart and asked charity; the young man replied “that he had nothing to give them”. One of the robbers seized him by the collar and pulled him down, while the other picked his pockets of 5s 7 1/2d. While they were thus employed, a carriage was seen coming down the hill, and the fellows ran off in to the wood by the side of the road. One of the robbers had a hat and a dark velvet jacket on; the other a round worsted cap and blue smocking frock; both the men appeared about 5feet ten inches high, and seemed about 30 years old.

LINCOLNSHIRE MERCURY
March 3rd 1843
Deaths – At Grasby, near Caistor on Thursday the 23rd ult. in later life Isabella, widow of Mr Richard Cuthbert, for many years a respectable farmer at Barnetby le Wold, near Brigg.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
June 21st 1843
CAISTOR – On Tuesday last, an inquest was held at Grasby, before Mr Marris, coroner, on the body of John Wilmore, aged three years, the son of John Wilmore labourer. It appeared by the evidence that the child had been suffering from cold and cough; and that on the previous night its mother obtained from a neighbour two teaspoonsfull of a powerful opiate, which she administered to the child. In the night it was discovered to be very ill, and the father went to Caistor to procure the attendance of Mr Smith, surgeon, but before he arrived the child was dead. Mr Smith having obtained from the incautious neighbour the remainder of the opiate, proved to the jury that the quantity administered contained no less than three grains of opium, a dose decidedly poisonous to a child of tender years unaccustomed to its use. The coroner and jury animadverted strongly on the conduct of the neighbour who furnished the mixture, and a verdict of inadvertent poisoning was returned.

LINCOLNSHIRE MERCURY
April 19th 1844
GRASBY – A serious accident happened at Grasby, near Caistor, on Friday last, to the eldest son of Mr John Clark, farmer. He had taken a gun to the field where he was ploughing for the purpose of shooting crows, and had very cautiously (on account of its being loaded) put it over the hedge, lest the horses should come in contact with it when turning at the end of the land; but when he was about to leave the field, in reaching his arm at full stretch over the hedge to bring back the gun, it is supposed the trigger caught on a twig and discharged the piece, the contents of which passed through his arm, entering at the inside of the wrist, and passing out on the opposite side a little below the elbow. Mr Porter, surgeon found the bone so dreadfully shattered that amputation only could save the unfortunate youths life; the operation was therefore immediately performed, and he is now doing well.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
April 26th 1844
GRASBY – On Saturday a newly married woman from Grasby succeeded in purloining from the shop of Mr John Robinson, draper and grocer of the Market Place, Caistor, goods amounting to 4s 6d. She was detected in the act, and has been committed to Kirton for trial at the next session. Her friends have since tendered bail for her, and she will therefore be at liberty until the trial.

LINCOLNSHIRE MERCURY
June 13th 1845
CAISTOR – The respectable parish clerk of Grassby in this neighbourhood, departed this life on the 9th inst. and the villagers have in vain endeavoured to make out where their parson is; he has been for some time absent, and they have bootlessly enquired for him.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
July 18th 1845
GRASBY – Through the instrumentality of Mr Burkinshaw the church of Grasby is undergoing a thorough repair, and in perfect accordance with the church style of architecture. The nave has been re-pewed, the roof repaired, &c %c by means of a church rate which was obtained by him (Mr Burkinshaws)influence in the parish, and was moreover, even acceded to by those who came with a party spirit to oppose it, but could not withstand his arguments in its favour. The chancel end is undergoing a thorough repair, and will be beautified by a magnificent CRUX CHRISTI, the expence of which will be defrayed by his own liberality and that of his Brigg friends and clergy, who have come forward in a manner, worthy of commendation. By the kind permission of the Rev West, of Wrawby, his curate, the Rev Dunwell, gratuitously officiates with Rev Hughes, who is appointed to the place, enters upon the curacy vacated by the Rev P L Drake, and is expected to commence his duties about the 15th of next August. The spirit with which Mr Burkinshaw has undertaken so praiseworthy an act – the effectual manner in which he has used his influence – his indefatigable exertions to restore so sacred an edifice from the ruinous and dilapidated condition into which it has fallen – and his liberality, are worthy the imitation of his brother churchwarden, while neighbouring parishes have debated church rates, and contested for the same with a feeling everything but christian, he, by mild yet persuasive argument, so silenced and so won over to his side the few who came to object to the rate, that it was carried without a dissentient voice. Correspondent

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
April 14th 1854
Lindsey Sessions – John Daniels, 38, labourer, charged with assaulting, beating and ill-treating James Winship, constable, with intent to prevent his lawful apprehension and detention at Grasby on the 1st of August 1853, also Supt Potton at Brigg on January 23rd last. Sentenced to 12 months imprisonment.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
July 6th 1854
GRASBY – Shortly will be offered for sale by public auction, unless previously disposed of by private contract. A very desirable Freehold farm containing 240 acres of very best wold land in the highest state of cultivation – situate in Grasby.
Marris & Smith, Solicitors, Caistor

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
November 30th 1855
BRIGG – Edward Bainbridge, a servant in the employ of Mr Freer Holgate of Keelby, was summoned for absenting his self from his masters employ and so misconducting himself that on one occasion by furious driving he broke his wagon and injured his team very materially – Slight, foreman to Mr Holgate, deposed that the man had been guilty of neglecting his duties and sometimes going away for the whole night; and that on the day in question when the pretended accident had taken place, he had ran his horses a distance of 12 miles – from Keelby to North Kelsey – Mr Garfit who appeared for the defendant, endeavoured to show that there was nothing extraordinary in horses with an empty wagon running five miles an hours and that it was not at all surprising that on descending such a hill as the Grasby hill, such an accident should occur and the horses stumbling and breaking their knees – The Magistrates retired and adjudged the man to pay including costs £6.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
March 20th 1857
BRIGG – An examination took place in the office of Messrs Nicholson, Hett & Frear, Solicitors before C L Elwes Esq., magistrate, concerning a complain on one Ann Bedford of Grasby, she stated that William Markham, of the same place did wilfully break her windows by throwing large stones at them. In cross examination, the plaintiff swore most distinctly that she saw the prisoner, and described his dress, although Markham declared that he was in another part of the county that very day, and at the very hour when the alleged offence took place, Mr Haynes, solicitor of Gainsborough defended the prisoner, but failed to shake the testimony of the complainant. The prisoner was fined in mitigated damages and costs £1-3-4.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
May 29th 1857
GRASBY – An accident which nearly proved fatal to man and horse happened here on Monday. As Mr Pygotts waggon, laden with wheat, was descending the hill into the village, the shaft horse became overpowered and all started off at full gallop till they reached the bottom, where trying to turn the corner all rolled over together, scattering corn, sacks, waggon and horses in all possible directions.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
November 6th 1857
BRIGG – William Markham of Grasby, was summoned by PC Tuxford of the same place with being drunk and creating a disturbance. Fined 5/- and 10/6 costs.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
November 20th 1857
GRASBY – Short Weights – Last Thursday an unlooked for visit was made to Grasby by the Inspector of Weights and Measures, who, to the astonishment of the poor shopkeepers, carried away nearly the whole of their weights

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
February 12th 1858
CAISTOR – Ann Byron, of Grasby, summoned Sarah Baron of the same place for an assault, defendant admitted the plaintiffs charge and was fined 4/6 and costs. Grasby is notorious for fighting women. Catherine Blanchard, of Searby, a servant, summoned Mr and Mrs Batton, of Caistor, in whose service she had been living for two separate assaults, which she distinctly proved to the satisfaction of the bench and they were ordered to pay costs of 18/6 for each offence.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
April 2nd 1858
GRASBY NATIONAL SCHOOL – This school was visited on Monday, by one of Her Majesty’s Inspectors, the Rev Barry, who expressed himself highly pleased with the progress the children had made during the past year.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
June 11th 1858
BRIGG – William Markham, a youth, was brought upon a warrant charged with killing game at Grasby. There were three other charges against him for all of which the bench fined him the following – £2 and £1-9-6 costs; £1 and 36/- costs; £1 and 16/- costs and a month on each charge.
LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
November 3rd 1858
BRIGG – William Markham, a notorious poacher, formerly of Grasby, but latterly resident of Brigg, stood charged with being concerned in the recent murder of a gamekeeper at Bishop Burton, near Beverley. From some information as to his being mixed up in the affair, he was apprehended on Sunday last by PC Mason of Caistor, and since examined by Brigg Magistrates, who remanded him to Beverley. Superintendent Gibson of that place being present to take him into charge. Mr Paterson, surgeon of Brigg stated that he had taken from the prisoners face three shot corns of No 5 shot, two of which were in his left thigh and four on his right as if perforated by shot. He gave his opinion that the marks had been done within the last ten days. Superintendent Scanlon had searched the house were the prisoner lived but could find neither his gun or velveteen coat he used to wear and he refused to give information on the subject.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
March 4th 1859
GRASBY – To be sold at Auction by Mr Rippinggale at the Cross Keys Inn, Grasby on Thursday the 10th of March 1859 at 5 o’clock in the Afternoon (subject to such conditions of Sale as will be produced)
THE FOLLOWING Valuable Freehold and Tithe Free Estate at Grasby and Clixby, in the County of Lincolnshire in Lots containing 2 acres each or in such other Lots as may be agreed at the time of Sale viz:-
All that Close of Meadow or Pasture Ground called ‘Grasby Lower Close’ late in the occupation of Mr Burkinshaw, and now Mr Barker, containing by recent admeasurement 18 acres 3 rood and 3 perch in the Parish of Grasby and 1 acre 3 rood 33 perch in the Parish of Clixby, (be it more or less) with a Right of Road to the Brigg Turnpike, through fields called ‘The Little Milling and the Great Milling’ in the Parish of Clixby.
The above property will be offered in one Lot and if not sold will then be offered in three Lots.
Plans from Maughan & Fowler Surveyer.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
March 24th 1859
Brigg – Certificates of Merit – we observe from the ‘Class List’ of successful candidates that Mr Berry of the National School, Wrawby and Mr Winter of Grasby, have just been awarded Certificates of Merit.

LINCOLNSHIRE CHRONICLE
July 28th 1859
The Last of the Weavers – Grasby – Thomas Tindale, two looms; John Brown, two looms.