Levick – Market Place

 

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George Haddesley writing in 1940 about Caistor in the 1880‟s – “Near to Parker‟s was Mr. Levick, the Chemist and Druggist. I remember best his son, who was quite a dandy, and always well dressed. He was much older than I

Mr Levick was in the Market Place in 1849 until 1891 preparing and selling

Pectoral Balsam a “marvellous and certain remedy for coughs, colds asthma, bronchitis, hoarseness, and all affections of the chest, throat and lungs for just 1/11⁄2, 2/9 or 4/6 a bottle

Tic and Neuralgic Mixture at 1/11⁄2 or 2/9 a bottle – “in addition to giving quick relief, tends to strengthen the nerves, and thus render the system less liable to recurrence of further attacks.”

Whooping Cough Mixture “…never having failed in any case tio give relief at 1/- and 2/- a bottle

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Photograph by Alan Dennis

Rev. David Saunders from “Caistor Market Place” published 2012 – “In our time …. Mr. Rowley Clark had the shop as a barber’s, and sold fishing tackle. During the C19th, for a long time, the property was owned by a chemist and druggist … George A. Levick started a business on a different site nearer the Red Lion I believe, but moved to these premises in 1855. In July that year Susan Haddelsy, daughter of Charles Robert, in one of her letters, remarked: ‘They are converting Mr. Smith’s house into a shop for Levick.’
Mr. Smith had bought the property from Samuel Booth in 1818 or 1820. He had a son, Benjamin Anderson Smith, also a doctor. In 1851 they both occupied houses in the Market Place……
Possibly Dr. Benjamin Jnr. had a house behind the frontage, for William Pybus in 1841 was already on this section of the Market Place next to Levick’s. … Dr. Benjamin Jnr. moved away in 1851.

…. George Levick bought the property or £750 and there he stayed until his retirement in 1891. Throughout his residence in Caistor he was a pillar and a senior deacon of the Congregational / Independent Church…. One of his sons, George A. M. Levick was trained as a chemist to carry on the business… he had other ideas and became a commercial traveller. …. because of the agricultural depression trade was going through a bad time then, and there were still three chemists in the Market Place.

25th June 1860

Charles Brown whose chemist son was asked if he would like the business, was by his analysis of the situation clearly against any involvement.
The business dragged on for a few years, run by a Mr. Timmins until he moved away in 1894. After he moved away, “Levick’s” ceased to exist.
The property was bought at a low price by Robert John Watson, who was Postmaster and a chemist. He rented the house out.
For a time it was occupied by Lacey and Clay, as an early photograph taken during an election shows.
Then came Fred Smith, a butcher, in 1911; he bought it from Mr. Watson’s widow for £570 in 1914. However he only used it as a shop and in 1911 was still living on South Street.

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The Rural Deanery wanted a central meeting place for its group of parishes, in order to use it for committee meetings and other Deanery groups. They bought it from Mr. Smith in 1992 for £550. I do not know how long they retained it.”

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By October 1891 Albert Timmins was the dispensing and family chemist selling pure drugs and chemicals of every description; toilet requisites, perfumery, patent medicines, mineral waters and proprietary articles at store prices for cash. Teeth were also carefully extracted.